Aktuelles

Mai

Vortrag: 
Sieben Jahre mit dem Japaner

Christine Rinderknecht 

Mittwoch, 11. Mai 2022, 18.30–19.30
Rämistrasse 71, 8006 Zürich, Raum KOL-E-13 

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In dem Buch erzählt die Autorin die Geschichte ihres Grossonkels Wilhelm Kuprecht, der von 1902-1909 als Kupferstecher und Techniker für neue Drucktechniken von 1902-1909 in Kyoto gearbeitet und gelebt hat. In jenen Jahren hat er eine grosse Sammlung hauptsächlich zeitgenössischer japanischer Kunst zusammengestellt. Die Autorin erzählt von der Entdeckung dieser Sammlung, von ihren Recherchen und entwickelt in ihrem Buch eine vielstimmige Geschichte, die unterschiedliche Deutungen und Möglichkeiten dieser Biographie zulässt.   Bei ihrer Präsentation wird sie eine Einführung ins Buch geben, ausgewählte Stellen daraus lesen und ausgehend von einem Vers von Antonio Machado, den sie an den Anfang ihres Texts gesetzt hat über das Thema Reisen sprechen, Wilhelms Reisen, ihre Recherchereisen, die inneren Reisen, die Reisen am Schreibtisch mit ihrem Material.   Zwischen den einzelnen Teilen wird sie zwei Video-Ausschnitte präsentieren, die Stücke aus der Sammlung zeigen und ihre Recherchen in Kyoto.      

Christine Rinderknecht ist Autorin/Co-Leiterin von Gubcompany, Theater und Performances für Kinder und Jugendliche. Sie hat Germanistik, Romanistik und Literaturkritik studiert in Zürich, Paris, Berlin. Sie schreibt Theaterstücke, Romane, Erzählungen. U.a. 2002 «ein Löffel in der Luft», Roman, Pendo Verlag, Zürich. 2005 «Lilli», Roman, Pendo Verlag Zürich. «Livia_13», Theaterstück, frei nach dem Film Hip hip hurra von Teresa Fabik, Theaterstückverlag München, Übertragung ins Russische, «Stressfaktor_15», Übertragung ins Rumänische und Ungarische. 2021, «Sieben Jahre mit dem Japaner», Verlag Die Brotsuppe. Die Arbeit an diesem Werk wurde mit einem Werkbeitrag des Kuratoriums Aargau gefördert.  
 www.christinerinderknecht.ch           

Flyer (PDF, 17 MB)

Der Vortrag wird auf Deutsch gehalten.  Für Fragen kontaktieren Sie bitte die Abteilung Kunstgeschichte. kgoa@khist.uzh.ch

Dieser Anlass wird von der Schweizerisch-Japanischen Gesellschaft unterstützt. 

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Mai

Lecture:
Combining (historical) Anthropology and Art History: Researching Japanese War Motif Textiles
Dr. Klaus J. Friese 
Friday, 6th May, 2022, 12:15–13:45

Karl Schmid-Strasse 4, 8006 Zürich, Room KO2-F-150


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Omiyamairi お宮参りkimono for small boy, ca. 1935,  
yūzen dyed silk, Museum Fünf Kontinente, Munich  

Japanese kimono are associated with timeless elegance and beauty. However, in what appears to contradict this popular understanding of Japanese-style cut textiles, from 1894 to ca. 1942 a large number of Japanese textiles were decorated with explicit images of modern wars, e.g. violent attacks on the enemy, tanks, fighter planes and battleships.  Although these Japanese war motif textiles are frequently called "Propaganda Kimonos", this term does not reflect the complex and entangled meanings which designers, producers and owners associated with these textiles. An interdisciplinary theoretical and methodological approach including Actor-Network-Theory (ANT), New Materialism and Social Aesthetics allows to gain a better understanding of the agency of clothing within the everyday life of the Japanese civilian population during war times. The case studies in this presentation provide insights into the multi-faceted and sometimes even contradictory meanings associated with the war motif textiles.  

Klaus J. Friese is a lecturer (Lehrbeauftragter) at the Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology of Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich, Germany. For his thesis “Aesthetics of War: Japanese War Motif Kimonos”, he received a double doctorate in East Asian Art History from University of Zurich and in Cultural Anthropology from Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich. His areas of research and interest are museum anthropology and material culture studies.                   

Flyer (PDF, 1 MB)

The lecture will be held in English and is open to the public (no registration is necessary). For questions, please contact the Section for East Asian Art: kgoa@khist.uzh.ch

 


März

Lecture:
A Culture of Smoking: Artistic and Cultural-Historical Significance of the Japanese Smoking Tradition   
Günther Heckmann and Dr. Achim G. Weihrauch of IFICAH

Tuesday, 1st March 2022, 16:30–17:30
Rämistrasse 71, 8001 Zürich, Room KOL-G-217

Covid-19 related precautions: In order to ensure everyone’s safety, we recommend all attendees to wear masks for the duration of the event.
                       Pipe case, ojime, and tobacco pouch.  Textiles, leather, lacquer, and metalwork.  19th century, Japan. IFICAH Collection

Tobacco was introduced to Japan by the Portuguese in the late sixteenth century and quickly became a mainstream enjoyment of the Japanese public. During the Edo period (1615-1867), it became common for men and women to enjoy smoking in public and private spaces, and artists competed with each other in making the most attractive pipes, pipe cases, tobacco pouches, and related paraphernalia using luxurious and rare materials and complex techniques.  Examination of these objects reveals the innovative powers of the artists and show intermedial, even intercultural, aspects of these fascinating and innovative artforms, that included metalware, textiles, leather, bamboo, precious stones, and a wide range of materials.  The objects also provide an excellent way to engage with and understand Japan’s early modern material culture.    

IFICAH is represented by:    

Günther Heckmann is a restorer and conservator of Japanese lacquer objects. He is a publicly appointed and sworn expert for Japanese lacquer works. He serves as chairman of the IFICAH Foundation and Director of the Museum of Asian Culture affiliated to the Foundation.    

Dr. Achim G. Weihrauch studied ethnology and prehistory at the University of Basel. He finished his doctorate in 2002 with a research focus on East and Southeast Asia. He worked as a scientific assistant in the Departments of Southeast Asia and Oceania at the Museum der Kulturen Basel from 1994 to 2003. From 2003 to 2014, he was employed for engineering and patent processing. Since 2014, he serves as a scientific advisor and author for the IFICAH Foundation. He is also a freelance bladesmith and restorer since 1995 until today. He is a publicly appointed and sworn expert for edged weapons.  

Flyer (PDF, 268 KB)

The lecture will be held in English and German and is open to the public (no registration is necessary). For questions, please contact the Section for East Asian Art: kgoa@khist.uzh.ch

 


Februar

Lecture:
Some Encounters, or the Footsteps of a Collector 
Philippe A. F. Neeser

Tuesday, 8th February 2022, 18:00–19:00
Rämistrasse 59, 8001 Zürich, Room RAA-G-01

Covid-19 related requirements: Please note that 2G conditions apply to this event. Access to the lecture is only permitted to persons with a certificate that confirms full recovery or vaccination. In addition, all attendees are obliged to wear masks at all times.

Neeser Philippe image

One of the most cherished sentences in Japanese is surely ichigo ichi’e: each encounter is unique: you seize the opportunity or let it go. These encounters not only happen between human beings, they may also happen with objects. The collector knows that sometimes he or she chooses the object, and that sometimes the object chooses the collector. 

In my decades of collecting, I have tried to keep an open eye at all times and in any circumstances, nevertheless, I still have regrets. Nostalgia is probably a part of any collector’s life. In this presentation, Philippe Neeser looks forward to sharing his many experiences with you.

Philippe A. F. Neeser is in many ways the Swiss person of his generation with the most profound cultural connections to Japan. Having lived in Japan for over thirty years, he holds deep connections to the Imperial House and to the world of the tea ceremony. A long-time practitioner of the tea ceremony, he has been given a tea master name Sōsui by the grand master of the Urasenke and was the first westerner allowed to give tea in front of the Daibutsu of the Tōdaiji Temple in Nara. In November 2008 he received the Order of the Rising Sun. He is also a great collector of Japanese art and has recently donated his collection of 400 tea-ceremony-related objects to the Fondation Baur; he is presently writing a catalogue of these objects.

Flyer (PDF, 472 KB)

The lecture will be held in English and is open to the public (no registration is necessary). For questions, please contact the Section for East Asian Art: kgoa@khist.uzh.ch

This event is generously supported by the Swiss-Japanese Society.

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Online International Symposium

Ariana Museum

Online International Symposium
Japanese Ceramics That Arrived in Switzerland: Discovery of the Musée Ariana Collection
6th January 2022

See full details here 
 


50 Jahre Kunstgeschichte Ostasiens