Showcase PhD

Prizes and awards

PhD students of the PhF have been awarded for their work. Congratulations!

  • Michelle Loher received a Doc.CH grant from the SNF for her dissertation project in psychology. We are very pleased that we were able to support her in the application process with a start-up grant from the Graduate School.
  • Cornelia Pierstorff receives one of the three doctoral prizes of the Studienstiftung des Deutschen Volkes 2022. For her dissertation "Ontologische Narratologie. Welt erzählen bei Wilhelm Raabe" she is awarded the Johannes Zilkens-Promotionspreis 2022.
  • Daniel Deplazes has been awarded the Nachwuchspreis for Historical Educational Research of the Julius Klinkhardt-Verlag at the Congress of the Section Historical Educational Research of the DGfE for the synopsis and work samples of his dissertation "Ruinen der Heimerziehung. Das Landerziehungsheim Albisbrunn in den Akteur-Netzwerken des Schweizer Heimwesens, 1960-1990". Daniel Deplazes is also the winner of the Tintenfasspreises 2021, which the jury awarded for his article entitled "'Die Lernmaschinen waren (...) ein Zückerchen' - Das Gelfinger Schulexperiment von 1968 bis 1972".

Arbeitsgruppe: «Ethnographie im Kontext von Flucht*Migration»

Gruppenbild Ethnographie
Gruppenbild Ethnographie

Die Arbeitsgruppe wurde von der Graduiertenschule durch Fördergelder für selbstorganisierte Arbeitsgruppen unterstützt.

Zu zwei mehrtägigen Retraiten kamen insgesamt fünf Promovierende der Erziehungswissenschaften und Ethnologie der Universität Zürich zusammen. Wir arbeiten in ganz unterschiedlichen Forschungsprojekten jedoch verbindet uns ein ethnographischer Forschungszugang und eine thematische Verortung im Bereich Flucht*Migration. Im Zuge der beiden Aufenthalte interpretierten wir im Sinne einer Forschungswerkstatt Materialien der Teilnehmerinnen, tauschten uns zu unseren jeweiligen methodologischen Fragen aus, lasen Forschungsliteratur und räumten uns Zeit zum Schreiben an einem Ort ein, der den Einflüssen des Alltags ein stückweit entzogen war. Im Rückblick bleibt uns neben dem wissenschaftlichen Austausch auch jener informellere zum Doktorieren im Allgemeinen sowie besonders unter Bedingungen von Corona positiv in Erinnerung. 

Summer Course in Reading Chinese Inscriptions

Summer Course in Reading Chinese Inscriptions
Summer Course in Reading Chinese Inscriptions

This working group is supported by the Graduate School through grants for self-organized working groups.

The ability to decipher inscriptions on various visual media written in Chinese cursive script is a crucial skill for researchers in the field of East Asian art history. Scholars cannot always rely on secondary sources and are often faced with the challenge of reading and transcribing original writing from primary sources. Such writing appears in several calligraphic styles that require instruction and practice to decipher. The ability to read Chinese cursive inscriptions significantly enhances a scholar’s research competence and is, if not a prerequisite, regarded as a highly valued asset for jobs in academia or museums. 

The members of our workgroup, Alina Martimyanova, Natasha Fischer-Vaidya, Xenia Piëch, Anna Elisabeth Herren, and Isabelle Leemann, all encountered similar difficulties in reading inscriptions written in Chinese script in their individual dissertation projects and shared the aim to improve their reading skills through discussion and exchange with fellow researchers as well as with specific guidance from a specialist in the field. With this objective in mind, the group organized regular study sessions over the summer of 2021, under the expert tutelage of Prof. Hui-Wen Lu, Associate Professor and Director of the Graduate Institute of Art History at National Taiwan University, who specializes in the history of calligraphy and painting in pre-modern China. 

Under the careful instruction of Prof. Lu, the group underwent intensive training in reading and writing Chinese cursive script. The group members familiarized themselves with the varied styles of handwriting by using a textbook on cursive script as well as exemplary calligraphic works by artists such as Xue Shaopeng (active late 11th to early 12th century) or Dong Qichang (1555–1636). Due to the COVID pandemic, sessions were held online. This format made it possible to be instructed remotely by a highly qualified expert in the field. The difficulties of teaching handwriting in an online format were overcome by setting up multiple devices and by submitting video recordings of writing samples. 

This project was made possible through the financial support by the Graduate School and contributed to the advancement of individual dissertation projects of the workgroup members, who intend to continue holding peer meetings to work together on complex handwritten inscriptions encountered in their research.

«How to Teach Art?»

HTTA Cover
HTTA Cover

This working group is supported by the Graduate School through grants for self-organized working groups

How to teach art? How to speak and understand the language of art? Between April and July 2018, acclaimed Polish artist Artur Żmijewski invited a group of PhD students from three Zurich universities (UZH, ETH, ZHdK) to collectively reflect on these programmatic questions. Over the course of four months, we met several times a week for hour long sessions, following individual and collective exercises induced by Żmijewski which resulted in drawings, videos, photographs, 16mm films and hours of intense conversations. 

Although the workshop formally ended in fall 2018 with an extensive contribution to the exhibition 100 Ways of Thinking at Kunsthalle Zurich and the departure of Żmijewski, the intense, interdisciplinary exchange between us participants carried on up to this day. Over time, it became clear that the workshop and the collaborations that emerged from it are a pivotal part of our PhD experience: it shaped and sharpened our way of thinking, not just as artist-researchers but also as academics who conduct research on contemporary art and its practices and thinking modes. 

With the financial support of the Graduate School, we were able to turn the experience of the workshop into a book. This gave us the opportunity not only to document the workshop and to present the material we collectively produced during and after it but also to reflect on the workshop’s impact on our individual dissertations. For this, we met up regularly, starting from April up until August 2021. Over the course of these 5 months, we re-visited the workshop in depth, we curated and contextualized the material, prepared the manuscript, and collectively wrote an introductory text and an extensive reflection part in which we carved out the many interconnections between the workshop and our academic research. 

The book titled «How to Teach Art?» will be published on December 27, 2021 by Diaphanes.

We are very happy that the Graduate School enabled us to share insight from the process with the up-and-coming young scientist community and with anyone interested in questions around the topic and methodology of art-as-research. 

Carla Gabriela Engler (UZH, Department of Film Studies), Wiktoria Furrer (HSLU/ZHdK), Maria Ordonez (UZH, Institute of Art History), and Nastasia Louveau (UZH, Slavonic Seminar). 

Queering the Boundaries of the Arts in the Sinosphere

Poster IOA und IAH
Poster IOA und IAH

This working group is supported by the Graduate School through grants for self-organised working groups.

“Queering the Boundaries of the Arts in the Sinosphere” was an online bilingual (English and Chinese) workshop organized by the PhD Candidates Diyi Mergenthaler, Helen Hess, and Sujie Jin, with the contributions by Mehmet Berkay Sülek (Amsterdam University) and Dr. Justyna Jaguscik. This event took place at Zoom from 27th to 29th May in 2021. Our workshop investigated the contact zones in which Sinophone queer artists, writers, curators, and cultural activists meet, cooperate, and occasionally conflict with each other. It included presentations by and roundtable discussions with internationally established Sinophone artists, activists, and curators in the fields of queer artmaking and curating, as well as scholars and junior researchers who engage with these queer voices. 

In the first session, the artist-director Fan Popo, activist-director Wei Tingting, and activist-artist Shi Tou gave presentations and discussed queer artmaking, activism, and community support. The second session featured four artists’ talks by the established artist Xiyadie, artist-curator Whiskey Chow, and the emerging artist Wei Yimu as well as the kinbaku practitioner Gandalf. They reflected on their artistic and curatorial work as well as their engagement with gender stereotypes and vulnerability. The third session interrogated the relationship between participatory observation and academic writing about “queer” culture. The activist-scholars Dian Dian, Dr. Bao Hongwei, and young researcher Shen Xiyu exchanged their views on translating and historizing “queer” in a cross-cultural and interdisciplinary context. The fourth session featured presentations by artist Li Xinmo, artist Ma Yanhong, and curator Juan Xu. They provided insights into the politics of the body, queer sensibilities, and the Avant-gardism in China’s female-authored art. In the last session, we screened Ergao’s latest dance film Kung Hei Fat Choy N+. The film-screening was followed by a discussion between Dr. Wang Qian, Diyi Mergenthaler, and the artist Zeng Burong. Their discussion centered around the queering of lowbrow culture and queer temporalities. 

Despite the restrictions on travelling and social distancing in the Covid-19 pandemic, our workshop provided a rare opportunity to deeply engage with a transnational artistic and academic network in the Sinosphere. All sessions were proceeded with the simultaneous interpretations provided by Michael Deeter, Feifei Zhan and Kexin Wei. We are grateful for the financial support by UZH Graduate School and Graduate Campus.

Peer-Arbeitsgruppe "Netzwerk DoLi"

Gruppenbild DoLi
Gruppenbild DoLi

Die Peer-Arbeitsgruppe «Netzwerk DoLi» wurde von der Graduiertenschule durch Fördergelder für selbstorganisierte Arbeitsgruppen unterstützt.

Im Sommer 2021 hat sich ein Doktorandinnennetzwerk der Literaturwissenschaften gegründet, das sich aus insgesamt fünf Doktorandinnen der ÄDL (Kathia Müller, Sarah Möller) und NDL (Christine Brunner, Nadia Brügger, Valerie Meyer) zusammensetzt. Dies aus der Erkenntnis – insbesondere aus dem Jahr 2020 –, dass man sich als Nachwuchswissenschaftlerin die Arbeitsumgebungen, die einen fördern, selbst schaffen muss. Um eine solches Umfeld mit regelmässigem Peer-Feedback und gemeinsamen Schreibzeiten innerhalb der Arbeitsgruppe aufzubauen, wurden mithilfe des GS-Grant zwei Kick-Off-Veranstaltungen durchgeführt: Anfang Juli 2021 wurden während eines zweitägigen Workshops mit der Schreibberaterin Susanna Blaser-Meier unterschiedliche Formate gemeinsamen Schreibens und konstruktiven Peer-Feedbacks kennengelernt und erprobt. Beides wurde bei der zweiten Veranstaltung, die aus einer einwöchigen Schreibretraite bestand, vertieft. Die Gruppe hat sich zu diesem Zweck Ende August 2021 für eine Woche ins Kurhaus Bergün zurückgezogen, um sich dort abseits des Alltags in einer ruhigen Umgebung für eine Woche intensiv gemeinsam dem Schreiben zu widmen und sich täglich über die eigene Arbeit auszutauschen und sich wechselseitig Rückmeldung zu geben. Durch die beiden Veranstaltungen konnte eine Kultur der gegenseitigen Förderung und des gegenseitigen Austauschs etabliert und gestärkt werden, die weitergezogen wird und die Teilnehmerinnen auch über den Abschluss ihrer Arbeiten hinaus auf ihren wissenschaftlichen Karrierewegen begleiten wird. Das Netzwerk trifft sich vierteljährlich, um die in den beiden Kick-Off-Veranstaltungen erlernten Formate des Peer-Feedbacks weiter zu vertiefen und sich in der Forschungsarbeit zu stärken, was besonders für Frauen und queere Menschen im wissenschaftlichen Betrieb immer noch von elementarer Bedeutung ist.

Working Group Romanoslavica

Gruppenbild Romanoslavica
Gruppenbild Romanoslavica

This working group is supported by the Graduate School through grants for self-organized working groups

The self-organised working group Romanoslavica consisting of the three PhD students, Alberto Giudici, Ivan Šimko, and Olivier Winistörfer, tries to further enhance the collaboration between early-career researchers of the Romance and Slavic departments of the University of Zurich and to tackle research questions which are of interest to both disciplines.

In the context of our working group, we have been working on a parallel corpus of the hagiography of St. Parascheva of the Balkans. We have elaborated a method which allows us to mark linguistic (morphological, syntactic, lexical) features specific for non-standard varieties from both diachronic and dialectal perspectives.

This method has then been applied to different texts in Balkan Romance and Balkan Slavic. Thanks to the collaboration between early-career linguists from both departments, we could adapt the tag set to our different needs. At the moment, the corpus is being developed as an online database with a user-friendly interface, which is accessible by commonly used web-browsers, and which can be used for both research and didactic purposes. One example of such a corpus is available here:

Viaţa precuvioasei Maicei noastre Parascheva - Cazania lui Varlaam (Moldova, 1643)

Slovo Paraskevi - Pop Punčov Sbornik (Northwest Bulgaria, 1796) 

Furthermore, thanks to the Graduiertenschule of the University of Zurich and to Prof. Dr. Francesco Gardani, we were able to organise a round-table workshop with experts on the Balkan languages to gather feedback on our approach and to discuss possible future collaborations on November 5, 2021. The three invited speakers were Prof. Dr. Evangelia Adamou (CNRS), Dr. Magdalena Abadzhieva (Bulgarian Academy of Sciences), and Dr. Maxim Makartsev (University of Oldenburg/Russian Academy of Sciences).

The workshop focused on various instances of corpus-based research concerning contact phenomena. Historical corpora containing text traditions translated from archaic or foreign varieties, dialectal, speech-based corpora focusing on contact-induced language change as well as a study of dynamic, on-going changes in actual situations of bilingualism were presented. The workshop thus was not only a fruitful opportunity to exchange knowledge about topics relevant to Romance and Slavic studies, but also to exchange of methodological and technological ideas, often only known within individual institutes.

In total, over 35 early-career researchers, scholars, and students from the University of Zurich as well as institutions abroad participated in the workshop in person or via zoom.

Computational Methods Working Group

Gruppenfoto Computational Methods
Gruppenfoto Computational Methods

Die «Computational Methods Working Group» wurde von der Graduiertenschule durch Fördergelder für selbstorganisierte Arbeitsgruppen unterstützt. Sie wird zudem durch einen Grant der Digital Society Initiative gefördert.

Um bspw. Social-Media-Strukturen zu verstehen oder Medieninhalte automatisiert zu analysieren, werden in sozialwissenschaftlichen Fächern immer häufiger «Computational Methods» wie z. B. Machine Learning oder Netzwerkanalysen eingesetzt. Die steigende Nutzung dieser Methoden ist für Nachwuchswissenschaftler:innen eine Herausforderung, da mittlerweile in vielen akademischen Positionen Erfahrung in «Computational Methods» vorausgesetzt wird. Weil diese Methoden jedoch im Studium meist noch nicht vermittelt werden, müssen sich Doktorand:innen dieses Wissen selbstständig erarbeiten.
Valerie Hase, Lara Kobilke, Nico Pfiffner, Anna Staender (Institut für Kommunikationswissenschaft und Medienforschung), Daniel Vogler (Forschungszentrum Öffentlichkeit und Gesellschaft – fög/Universität Zürich), Theresa Gessler und Ivo Bantel (Institut für Politikwissenschaft) haben deshalb die «Computational Methods Working Group» gegründet. In dieser Arbeitsgruppe sollen Probleme und Anliegen von Nachwuchsforscher:innen in Bezug auf «Computational Methods» interdisziplinär diskutiert und gelöst werden. 
Konkret wurde 2021 ein virtuelles Networking Event «People, Research Interests & Methods in CSS», eine Online-Panel-Diskussion zur Karriere im Bereich CSS mit Titel «A Career in CSS – Dream or Disillusion?» sowie eine Online-Panel-Diskussion zu «Teaching Computational Social Science» organisiert. Diese Events geben jungen Forscher:innen die Möglichkeit, mit Senior Scholars die Chancen und Hindernisse einer akademischen Karriere mit Fokus auf «Computational Methods» zu diskutieren sowie laufende Projekte aus einem interdisziplinären Blickwinkel zu besprechen. Darüber hinaus werden dieses Jahr zwei Methodenworkshops durchgeführt: «Automated Image Analysis» und «Natural Language Processing in Practice». 

Weitere Informationen auf der Webseite der Working Group via https://www.cssmethods.uzh.ch/

Rethinking Art History through Disability

Flyer Rethinking Art History through Disability
Flyer Rethinking Art History through Disability
Flyer Rethinking Art History through Disability

This working group is supported by the Graduate School through grants for self-organized working groups

The working group entitled “Rethinking Art History through Disability” aims to create a useful model for rethinking disability in research and society by taking Art History as a departing point. In order to highlight the importance of rethinking the way we approach art history through the lens of the non-normative body, this working group focuses on functional diversity as well as of disability as a social model. 
The members of the working group, Virginia Marano, Charlotte Matter and Laura Valterio, propose alternative paths to map out the intersections of Disability Studies and Art History. They organize a series of reading groups and public events, such as artists’ and curators’ talks, in order to explore topics such as caregiving, the notion of crip time and vulnerability. Each talk is accompanied by a preparatory reading session open for students and junior researchers. These sessions give not only the opportunity to work on a growing archive of texts and deepen certain aspects of the talks, but also to create an interdisciplinary community of students and young researchers with shared interests across Switzerland. Each talk is recorded, edited and close-captioned and will then be made accessible on the project’s website. 
The exploration of disability-based social relations allows the group to concretize bottom-up initiatives and focus on ideas and projects that can be conceived and developed only in a cooperative dimension. 
For more information on the project see: www.khist.uzh.ch/disab

Materialität – Raum – Interaktion: Schnittstellen in Sprach- und Literaturwissenschaft

Mitglieder AG Kulturphilologie
Mitglieder AG Kulturphilologie

Die Arbeitsgruppe «Kulturphilologie» wurde von der Graduiertenschule durch Fördergelder für selbstorganisierte Arbeitsgruppen unterstützt.

Konstituierende Retraite der Arbeitsgruppe Kulturphilologie

Wer an der UZH Germanistik studiert, studiert meist Deutsche Sprach- und Literaturwissenschaft, also zwei (Teil-)Disziplinen in einem Fach. Spätestens auf Stufe Doktorat ordnet man sich einer der beiden Disziplinen zu. Wenn nun aber eine kulturwissenschaftliche Orientierung – wofür die UZH insbesondere auch mit dem Studienprogramm Kulturanalyse bekannt ist – für die sprach- und literaturwissenschaftliche Forschung leitend ist, werden transdisziplinäre Berührungspunkte offengelegt: Gemeinsame thematische und theoretische Grundlagen, Theoretiker*innen, Texte und Denkpositionen können für die Zusammenarbeit zwischen Literatur- und Sprachwissenschaftler*innen produktiv gemacht werden. An dieser Beobachtung setzt die geförderte Arbeitsgruppe an und hat im Auftaktworkshop (geplant als Retraite, durchgeführt als drei Online-Treffen) Materialität – Raum – Interaktion: Schnittstellen in Sprach- und Literaturwissenschaft das Potenzial sowie die Schwierigkeiten transdisziplinären Forschens ausgelotet.

Christoph Hottiger (Linguistik, UFSP Sprache und Raum), Daniel Knuchel (Linguistik, Deutsches Seminar), Salomé Meier (Literaturwissenschaft, Deutsches Seminar), Larissa Schüller (Linguistik, Deutsches Seminar), Vera Thomann (Literaturwissenschaft, Deutsches Seminar) und Thomas Traupmann (Literaturwissenschaft, Deutsches Seminar) haben alle eine philologische Grundausbildung sowie ein ausgeprägtes Interesse an unterschiedlichen semiotischen Codes, diskursiven Praktiken und deren Bedeutung in und für Kultur. In ihren Dissertationsprojekten orientieren sie sich an Ansätzen aus der Praxeologie, der Diskursanalyse und der Ethnomethodologie. Gemeinsam mit Daniela Hahn und Benno Wirz (beide Kulturanalyse) diskutierte die Gruppe ältere breit rezipierte und grundlegende Theorietexte, um den Stellenwert von Theorie für die Dissertationsprojekte, das eigene Fachverständnis und methodologische Unterschiede herauszuarbeiten.

Die produktiven Online-Treffen haben das Potenzial einer institutionell verankerten Zusammenarbeit offenbart und deutlich gemacht, dass die Gründung eines transdisziplinären germanistischen Nachwuchsnetzwerks Kulturphilologie wichtig ist, um in Austausch zu treten und die brachliegenden Synergien bestmöglich zu nutzen.

Self-organised working group on argument ellipsis in Turkish and Kurmanji

Members of the working group

This working group is supported by the Graduate School through grants for self-organised working groups.

The working group on Turkish and Kurmanji plans to study argument ellipsis in the child-directed and child speech to shed light on children’s verb acquisition in two languages, Turkish and Kurmanji. It will collaborate to write a paper on comparative analysis of argument ellipsis in these languages. 

To achieve this goal, the members of the working group, Sakine Cabuk Balli, Guanghao You and Ebru Ger, plan to improve the existing Turkish and Kurmanji corpora in order to be able to investigate argument ellipsis. The Turkish corpus is missing some morphological tagging and syntactic parsing. This requires the implementation of automatic parsers and manual correction of the parsed results. The Kurmanji corpus is in the process of being built with regard to transcription and annotation. Therefore, the members of the group will consult a linguist for help to check and correct the morphological tags and part of speech output in the Turkish corpus. To complete the transcription and morphological annotation of the Kurmanji corpus they will use ELAN and Toolbox. 

The improvement of these corpora will greatly contribute to ongoing work as part of the PhD studies at Language Development Lab where the organisers of the working group collaborate to work on verb acquisition in the Turkish and Kurmanji languages as well as many more languages. 

Following the preparation of the data for analysis, the working group will organise intensive training sessions on statistics for linguistic research, especially Bayesian statistics, so as to develop a better understanding of statistical models used in the data analysis. These two-days sessions will be led by Dr. Lena Jäger and focus on statistical models used in analysing the development of verb acquisition in child speech compared to child directed speech in the corpora collated. They will provide both, comprehensive training in the theory and hands-on practice and pave the way for analysis of the data not only in the group-members PhD studies. Sakine Cabuk Balli, Guanghao You and Ebru Ger are convinced that training in Bayesian statistics will not only serve their own goals but also those of other early-career researchers in their labs.

Computational Methods Working Group

Computational Working Group

Die «Computational Methods Working Group» wurde von der Graduiertenschule durch Fördergelder für selbstorganisierte Arbeitsgruppen unterstützt. Sie wird zudem durch einen Grant der Digital Society Initiative gefördert.

Um Social-Media-Strukturen zu verstehen oder Nachrichtenartikel automatisiert zu analysieren, werden in sozialwissenschaftlichen Fächern immer häufiger «Computational Methods» wie z. B. Machine Learning oder Netzwerkanalysen eingesetzt. Die steigende Nutzung dieser Methoden ist für Nachwuchswissenschaftler*innen nicht unproblematisch, da nun in vielen akademischen Positionen nach dem Doktorat Erfahrung in «Computational Methods» vorausgesetzt wird. Weil diese Methoden jedoch im Studium meist noch nicht vermittelt werden, müssen sich die Doktorand*innen dieses Wissen während des Doktorats selbstständig erarbeiten.
Valerie Hase, Lara Kobilke, Nico Pfiffner, Anna Staender, (IKMZ), Daniel Vogler (Forschungszentrum Öffentlichkeit und Gesellschaft – fög/Universität Zürich), Theresa Gessler und Ivo Bantel (Institut für Politikwissenschaft) haben deshalb eine «Computational Methods Working Group» gegründet. In dieser Arbeitsgruppe sollen Probleme von sozialwissenschaftlichen Nachwuchswissenschaftler*innen in Bezug auf «Computational Methods» interdisziplinär diskutiert und gelöst werden. 

Konkret wird ein Methodenworkshop zum Thema «Text Classification in Python» durchgeführt. Die Methode der automatisierten Inhaltsanalysen stellt eine der bedeutendsten Neuerungen durch «Computational Methods» dar. Neben diesem Methodenworkshop werden ein zweitägiges Event mit dem Titel «Young Scholars in Computational Social Science» veranstaltet. Dieses gibt Doktorand*innen die Möglichkeit, mit Senior Scholars aus dem Feld der «Computational Methods» die Chancen und Hindernisse einer akademischen Karriere mit Fokus auf «Computational Methods» zu diskutieren sowie laufende Dissertationsprojekte aus einem interdisziplinären Blickwinkel inhaltlich zu besprechen. Im Anschluss werden die Senior Scholars in einer offenen Diskussionsrunde von ihrer Karriere mit Fokus auf «Computational Methods» berichten und sich den Fragen der Doktorand*innen stellen.

Weitere Informationen auf der Webseite der Working Group via http://cssmethods.uzh.ch

Arbeitsgruppe Musik auf Reisen

Die Arbeitsgruppe «Musik auf Reisen» wurde von der Graduiertenschule durch Fördergelder für selbstorganisierte Arbeitsgruppen unterstützt.

Der Drang nach Musik führte (nicht nur) Musiker und Komponistinnen seit Jahrhunderten zum Bedürfnis oder zur Notwendigkeit zu reisen. Die Typologie der „Musiker-Reise“ ist dabei vielfältig: Konzertreisen, Bildungs- und Fortbildungsreisen, Werbe- und Bewerbungsreisen, Geschäftsreisen und Musikexpeditionen... Auch politisch oder gesellschaftlich bedingte Migrations- und Emigrationsbewegungen können betrachtet werden. Angesichts dieser umfassenden Relevanz kommen die meisten Doktorierenden der Musikwissenschaft (und auch benachbarter Fachbereiche) in der einen oder anderen Form mit dem Thema «Musik auf Reisen» in Berührung und das Thema verbindet unterschiedliche Forschungsschwerpunkte. 

Die von Esma Cerkovnik, Severin Kolb, Franziska Reich und David Reißfelder gegründete Arbeitsgruppe soll ein Forum bieten, in dem die Schwerpunkte Mobilität und Reisen methodisch vertieft, der Austausch zwischen den Doktorierenden im grösseren Kontext der jeweiligen Doktoratsthemen gestärkt und die gemeinsame Forschungsarbeit gefördert werden können. Das Augenmerk liegt dabei nicht auf einem Musik-Ort und seiner musikalischklanglichen Prägung, wie dies im Sinne der Soundscape-Forschung üblich ist, sondern auf Musik und Musiker*innen, die in ihrer Bewegung durch Landschaften und Orte erforscht werden.

An vier Arbeitstreffen, die auch von Doktorierenden anderer Fachbereiche besucht werden können, wird zunächst über spezifische Erarbeitungsformen des Themengebiets und Darstellungsweisen der Forschungsergebnisse diskutiert werden. 

Danach soll der Austausch mit internationalen Forschenden gefördert werden; die Arbeitsgruppe wird in diesem Zuge einen Experten/eine Expertin für Mobilität und Migration von Musikerinnen und Musikern für einen Gastvortrag ins Musikwissenschaftliche Institut einladen und gemeinsam mit Dr. Lenka Hlávková (Zirkulation von Musik und Musikern im spätmittelalterlichen Zentraleuropa), Prof. Dr. Marc Niubo (Italienische Oper in Zentraleuropa, 18. Jahrhundert) und Doktorierenden des Musikwissenschaftlichen Instituts der Karls-Universität Prag ein zweitägiges Kolloquium veranstalten.

Schreibretraite für Doktorierende der Kunstgeschichte

Die «Schreibretraite für Doktorierende der Kunstgeschichte» wird von der Graduiertenschule durch Fördergelder für selbstorganisierte Arbeitsgruppen unterstützt.

Die Weiterentwicklung der Schreibkompetenz ist für Doktorierende eine wichtige Voraussetzung, um die Dissertation zu einem erfolgreichen Abschluss zu bringen. Weder im Studium noch in der Doktoratsausbildung wird diesem Umstand jedoch genügend Rechnung getragen. Diese Lücke werden Virginia Marano, Patricia Lenz, Jonas Schnydrig, Vicky Kiefer und Ayse Pamuk mit der Organisation einer Schreibretraite füllen. Die Retraite soll die Schreibkompetenz der Teilnehmenden erweitern und deren Identität als Schreibende stärken. Sie soll ihnen ermöglichen, sich mit Peers auszutauschen und vor allem, substantielle Fortschritte im Schreiben der Dissertation zu erzielen. 

Damit die Teilnehmenden sich ganz auf ihr Schreiben fokussieren können, wird die eine Woche dauernde Retraite an einem ruhigen Ort in den Bergen durchgeführt und von der Schreibberaterin Dr. Susanna Blaser-Meier geleitet. Dr. Blaser-Meier wird der Gruppe verschiedene Schreibmethoden vermitteln. Täglich kann in ruhiger Atmosphäre am eigenen Schreibprojekt geschrieben und das selbstreflexive Schreiben sowie das Verfassen von Metatexten über das eigene Schreibhandeln geübt werden. Auch werden der eigene Schreibtyp bestimmt und typengerechte Massnahmen vorgeschlagen. Nach Bedarf werden die Teilnehmenden auch individuell beraten, damit sie ihren produktiven Arbeitsrhythmus finden können.

Daneben werden sich die Teilnehmenden gezielt gegenseitiges Feedback zu den geschriebenen Texten geben und konstruktives und wohlwollendes Peer-Feedback einüben. Die entsprechenden Methoden werden ebenfalls durch die Schreibberaterin vermittelt. 

Zu Gast an der Harvard University: Internationale Erfahrungen für Doktorierende der Erziehungswissenschaft

Zürcher Doktorierende in Harvard
Zürcher Doktorierende in Harvard

Vom 8. bis zum 22. September 2019 folgten drei Zürcher Doktorierende der Erziehungswissenschaft und ein Zürcher Professor einer Einladung an die Harvard University. Als Gastwissenschaftler*innen an der Graduate School of Education in Zusammenarbeit mit dem Harvard History Department haben sie internationale Kontakte geknüpft, geforscht, und allgemein Erfahrungen in ihrem Arbeitsbereich gesammelt.
Das internationale Pilotprogramm wurde vom Graduate Campus der UZH und der Movetia Stiftung finanziell unterstützt. Der Aufenthalt stand unter dem Arbeitsthema “The Funding of Higher Education: Different Objectives in Switzerland, the UK and the USA.” Hier lesen Sie den Exkursionsbericht (PDF, 14 MB).